Offence is the Best Defence

I was undergoing my probation period in one of the branches at Bhopal. One of my batchmates, Pushpa was also posted thereat. As Probationary Officers, we had to learn the basics of banking as clerks. So we used to move from one desk to another.

In those days, Day Book and GL (General Ledger) had to be written by hand. Day Book is an account book in which a day’s transactions are entered and tallied for transfer to the GL. It used to be a gigantic task normally assigned to a senior clerk.

As a part of training schedule, I was also assigned this job. I really enjoyed writing DB and GL. One day after writing, I was doing some other work at my desk in the evening, when one of the senior officers, Mr Balwant, standing over a counter, was checking my work. He asked someone standing nearby,
“Who has written DB and GL?”
He whispered my name, and then said, “New P.O.”

Mr Balwant was a ranker, and disliked the breed of POs. He uttered, “He has a very good handwriting. He should have been a clerk.”

I was listening to this conversation silently from a distance. I couldn’t control myself. I countered him whether a man with a good handwriting is entitled to a post of clerk only, ignoring all other qualities. He didn’t know I was listening. He remained tight lipped.

But a cold war had begun thereafter. Mr Balwant started pinpointing even minor mistakes in our works. One day he was after Pushpa, “You don’t know even this. Do your work diligently, madam.”

I knew he was not in the habit of reading new circular instructions of the bank. So I immediately pointed out to him, “But recent circular instruction says otherwise. Have you not read it, sir?”

My bluff worked and he got defensive. Pushpa was a little surprised at my sudden retort and thanked me for saving her from the ignominy of that moment. From then on, we were a good team during our stay of six months at that branch with a clear vision that in this case, offence is the best defence.


–Kaushal Kishore

20 Comments

  1. Standing up for yourself and others who need help, Kaushal is a template for an aspiring politician.
    Just a little reminder!
    I also remember that in your school years you were asked by your parents (if I am correct!) to practice your handwriting. You are, Kaushal, too good to be true, with your observation skill
    I wrote an essay about the importance of being observant and how to teach the children to learn it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Now I’m sure, you will not rest till I become a politician. That’s good for me too. Thank you, Joanna!
      Yes, your memory is sharp. My father was very particular about handwriting.
      I don’t remember having read your essay about children. Is it in your blog?

      Like

      1. Thank you, Kaushal, it is good to know that you remember your promise. I think, that I wrote somewhere that mothers taking children to school should allow having time to draw the child’s attention to different shades of green of trees and bushes and point to various things along the street while they were walking. The interesting door here, the side alleyway between
        other houses, some windows with interesting frames there. Observant people make better witnesses when necessary to report something, and of course, you could use this skill to your friend’s advantage.
        Thank you for your patience!

        Joanna

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You’re welcome, Joanna and thanks for giving details of the essay. Your points of observation are certainly relevant, even now. And yes, I’m very patient, if something is so interesting.

        Like

    1. I’m fine, Suma, and hope you are also doing well. You’re right, it’s a pleasure to discuss such things in private, and yes grapevine is so interesting in any organisation 👍😊🤗

      Like

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